ZOE Keeps Her Promise 2: 122 Mile Range (196km)

Arriving home after 122miles on one charge (Image: T. Larkum)
Arriving home after 122 miles on one charge (Image: T. Larkum)

After my previous attempt at a range record achieved 111 miles I was confident that I could beat it, so last week I had another go on my regular commuting route. This time I managed 122 miles (196km) on one charge. The approach was essentially the same as last time, so review that post for the details, except that I drove carefully and in Eco mode from the very start, and I had fully inflated the tyres beforehand.

I did, however, learn a few new things:

1. I knew this time the expected behaviour of the instruments, particularly the low charge indicators and the eventual complete loss of the range predictor, so I was more confident to keep driving even at a low battery state.

2. There is no ‘turtle’ mode that I could discern. Last time I thought the car was limited, though not consistently, to a maximum of 20mph. In fact I was confused; the limit came from the Speed Limiter value that I had set, and the reason I couldn’t set the speed to a lower value at the end, as I had hoped, is simply due to the Limiter having a minimum lowest speed setting of 20mph in all circumstances.

3. There is no easy way to determine the actual state of charge (SOC) left in the battery at any time. Therefore, towards the end, I stopped the car a number of times so that, on restarting, I could see the charge percentage indicator displayed. From this I could calculate how much further I could go (at least, until I checked it again). At the end the SOC was down to 2%.

4. The Total Consumption indicator is misleading. Although it displays a decimal point it only increments in whole numbers so you don’t know exactly what your consumption is (e.g. it jumps from displaying “20.0 kWh” to “21.0 kWh” with nothing in-between).

5. While driving my Eco score had been 97-98/100 but at the very end it jumped down to 0 (perhaps a hint that running out of charge is not considered to be good driving!).

Distance, speed and consumption details (Image: T. Larkum)
Distance, speed and consumption details (Image: T. Larkum)

Although this attempt had achieved a good range I am at a loss to see how I could improve it much further – particularly to something approaching the Spanish record. Therefore I probably won’t attempt it again until I have a better route to try it on, particularly one with fewer hills and junctions.

Nonetheless it was nice to get in the ZOE the next day after it had been recharged and be told the predicted range available was 116 miles.

116 miles promised (Image: T. Larkum)
116 miles promised (Image: T. Larkum)

Home Forums ZOE Keeps Her Promise 2: 122 Mile Range (196km)

This topic contains 12 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Trevor Larkum 4 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #5405

    Trevor Larkum
    Keymaster

    After my previous attempt at a range record achieved 111 miles I was confident that I could beat it, so last week I had another go on my regular commu
    [See the full post at: ZOE Keeps Her Promise 2: 122 Mile Range (196km)]

    #5410

    farblue
    Participant

    Good going Trevor!

    One interesting trick – the graph of consumption in the Electric Car menu on the R-Link *does* work to 1 decimal place and so can give you a more accurate estimate of usage. It also shows usage by the aircon. Add the two values together and round down to the nearest whole number to get the value displayed on the dash.

    #5412

    Deejay
    Participant

    Impressive! My normal range is about 85 miles, but I’m surrounded by motorways and fast roads which I think impacts it quite a lot. It turns out you get a poor speed score for doing 90 on a motorway…

    #5414

    Electric Ali
    Participant

    Very impressive!

    Especially in light of what John Hofmeister, former president of Shell Oil Co. is saying:

    “China’s increasing consumption of transportation fuels, combined with increases in India, other developing countries, and ongoing demand in the rest of the developed world, will lead to oil shortages within the next five years. Demand will exceed supply leading to ever higher prices and, for those nations heavily dependent upon imported oil, actual oil outages. China will thus drive a frenetic race to create alternative transportation fuels so mobility carries on.”

    http://peak-oil.org/wp-content/files/por130930.pdf

    #5433

    Trevor Larkum
    Keymaster

    Cheers guys!

    That’s an interesting view, Ali – but I noticed today that the local petrol price has dropped significantly, so it may yet be some time before we see that prediction happen.

    #5444

    farblue
    Participant

    We’ve also had the announcement of no tax increase on petrol for 2 years. Odd how previously the whole idea of the tax was to encourage better fuel efficiency (and less pollution) and investment in alternatives. Now the price is high enough to justify a move to alternatives and there’s been lots of investment everyone is getting nervous and backing out of the plan! Also note how the 2 years will see us neatly to the next elections…

    #5451

    Trevor Larkum
    Keymaster

    Yes, the current political parties are rubbish at leading on climate change, EVs, etc. One wants to keep fossil fuel prices down, the other wants to frack for more fossil fuel. I suspect we’ll look back on this decade as a huge wasted opportunity.

    #5457

    Electric Ali
    Participant

    With regard on tax on petrol and diesel, a little perspective is interesting.
    See the report linked below. On slide 6 you will note that the UK is in the high taxation category for petrol (far right hand side of chart). UK oil consumption has been going down since the recent price run-up started around 2005. Down the bottom end of the chart you have countries with highly subsidised prices including the likes of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and UAE. These subsidised prices are one of the causes of exponential growth in internal oil consumption leading to reduced exports. This, combined with the growth in consumption in China and India and more or less static crude oil production over the last 8 years is causing a shrinkage in the volume of oil on the global market. We may not have to wait 5 years for shortages to appear in the UK.

    http://www.giz.de/Themen/en/dokumente/giz2013-en-ifp2013.pdf

    #5648

    Trevor Larkum
    Keymaster

    A member of the French forum has achieved 214km (132 miles) on a charge, at an average speed of 37km/h (23mph):

    214km without recharging!

    – he consumed 23kWh, so presumably did a fair bit of regen braking.

    edit: just found another forum member who achieved 222km (138 miles):

    222km without recharging!

    – his trick seems to have been to use cruise control set to 60km/h.

    #5802

    Eunicholas
    Participant

    Hi all,

    I have done 127miles with 22miles left in the battery. all on the motorway at 57mph on cruise control. I had a full car, myself 3kids and my girlfriend.

    it’s was only meant to be a 100 miles trip but all the chargers I went to were all off line, so I charged at Renault martins in hatch who were very nice people.

    I found that the rlink was rubbish at finding chargers compatible with the Zoe.

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