Renault scheme transforms EVs into energy storage units

Pilot scheme beginning today aims to cut electric vehicles’ running costs and reduce energy usage from 2020

Renault has launched a revolutionary pilot scheme that aims to prove the feasibility of vehicle-to-grid charging systems by placing energy storage units aboard electric vehicles (EVs).

A fleet of Zoes have been adapted to enable reversible charging, which could help to bolster electricity supply at peak times. Renault anticipates that the technology will be ready for installation on customer vehicles as early as next year.

The system enables electric vehicles to stockpile energy supplies at times of low demand and then transfer electricity back to the grid when appropriate. By moderating power usage in this way, it could reduce strain on national electricity infrastructure, promote energy conservation and save its users money on running costs.

The first trials begin today in the Dutch city of Utrecht, in partnership with We Drive Solar, and on the Portuguese island of Porto Santo, where the scheme is backed by energy supplier Empresa de Electricidade da Madeira.

Read more: Autocar via Fuel Included News

All-new Renault Zoe spied looking a lot like today’s model

Should be significantly more powerful though.

After taking a look at Motor1.com UK’s homepage this week, one could assume the death of the internal combustion engine is right around the corner. That’s not entirely true but it’s more than obvious that nearly every automaker is embracing electrification under full power these days. And the latest to show progress is Renault which is now testing the second-generation Zoe on public roads.

2018 – Renault ZOE

Seen here is a heavily masked prototype of the all-electric car undergoing cold winter evaluations in Northern Europe. Interestingly, the shape of the trial car is almost completely identical to the Zoe that’s still on sale today. The camouflage is not letting us see many details of the body, but it appears that the EV will be slightly larger than its predecessor.

The resemblance to the current Zoe is especially striking at the back where even the light clusters seem to have an identical shape. Up front, we notice a larger Renault logo flanked by sleeker headlights probably using LED technology. Of course, at this early stage of testing, some of our assumptions might not be completely correct.

Read more: Motor1 via Fuel Included News