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This topic contains 388 replies, has 133 voices, and was last updated by  Trevor Larkum 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 389 total)
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  • #2002

    PerLyngemark
    Participant

    My name is Per Lyngemark, a Swede living in China (8years in Shanghai and 16 in Taiwan) and married to a Japanese. We will be moving back to Sweden after 23years in Asia mid-March this year.

    My last car was a Honda Civic I had in Taiwan, which I sold in 2005. In Shanghai we got a great subway system (tube/underground/metro) bus system, both are almost free to use. I thus never had a need of a car here since it’s slower to drive than taking the subway…

    I’ve been interested in EVs and clean technology for a long time and buying the first car in 8 years the ZOE is a natural choice.

    Since Sweden is a little backwards country in terms of EVs, I have to import mine from our more friendly neighbor, Denmark. However Sweden will come around once SAAB and VOLVO start making their EVs, then the government will make a 180degree turnaround to support EVs, oh well that’s democracy…

    I should also mention that moving back I will be looking for an apartment first, then buying a house. Thus I will be relying on domestic charging until we buy the house, so an EVSE cable is necessary for me. When I buy the house I will make sure the garage is suitable for EVs, hopefully it’s 20A 3phase 220V.

    #2003

    Anonymous

    Hi All.

    My name is Marc and I also live and work in Glasgow. Just made a reservation on the Renault Zoe website for a car for the office. We have a reservation number of 342. I have been intouch with Energy Saving Trust to ask about installing a power supply at our office. They were very helpful unlike Brittish Gas. It seems that unless you live in an area which Brittish Gas cover, they will charge you for domestic installation. What they dont tell you is that Glasgow however is cover by SSE and they are the ones I am going to speak to next. Just wondering if you guys know any problems with charging on a fast or rapid charger. We are fortunate to have a 3 phase power supply here in our office which at the moment tells me it’s 415v 50A which I think needs to be converted to 32A, but not sure. Is it ok to use this kind of supply every day or two? Also looking to do a domestic power supply at 240v 32A .  Thanks

    #2004

    Trevor Larkum
    Keymaster

    “Since Sweden is a little backwards country in terms of EVs, I have to import mine from our more friendly neighbor, Denmark. However Sweden will come around once SAAB and VOLVO start making their EVs, then the government will make a 180degree turnaround to support EVs, oh well that’s democracy…”

    I agree, but I don’t think Sweden is alone in that – I see Germany as doing exactly the same. Currently there are no subsidies for EVs – if there were, they would mostly get spent on Renault and other French cars. However, once BMW, VW and Audi have their EVs on the market – this year and next – I wouldn’t be surprised to see Germany introduce an EV subsidy..

     

    #2005

    Trevor Larkum
    Keymaster

    “We are fortunate to have a 3 phase power supply here in our office which at the moment tells me it’s 415v 50A which I think needs to be converted to 32A, but not sure. Is it ok to use this kind of supply every day or two?”

    The Zoe is unusual in being rated to take up to 43A on a three phase supply, so it sounds like that one should be do fine. I think the jury is out on using a fast charger daily. It is certainly the case that it is widely advised against because of the potential damage that could be caused. However from what I’ve read the investigation into the cause of Nissan Leafs in Arizona losing charge prematurely showed a close relationship with ambient temperature, but no relationship with regular fast charging.

     

    #2015

    PerLyngemark
    Participant

    Norway and Denmark also do not provide subsidies for EVs, however they do not tax them. For example a VOLVO in Denmark is 1.2mn SEK, while in Sweden the same car is 550k SEK. The ZOE in Denmark is 185k SEK, in Sweden we will get 40k SEK subsidized, price is unknown since it will be launched in 2014.

    Norway offers the EVs: VAT free, tax free, free parking, free electricity, free toll gates and you can drive in the bus lanes. This is until 2014 or 2015.

    China gives a free license plate (10k USD in Shanghai) and a 15k USD subsidy.

    I went to Renault in Shanghai yesterday, they had never heard about the ZOE and none of the ZE cars are sold here. Same with the Nissan dealership, no LEAF. With those amazing subsidies one would think the market would be great here…

    #2033

    Trevor Larkum
    Keymaster

    “I went to Renault in Shanghai yesterday, they had never heard about the ZOE and none of the ZE cars are sold here. Same with the Nissan dealership, no LEAF. With those amazing subsidies one would think the market would be great here…”

    Nissan have plans for the LEAF in China, but they’re doing it through a local manufacturer:

    http://green.autoblog.com/2013/02/19/dongfeng-fengshen-e30-electric-vehicle-coming-to-china-next-year/

    #2035

    PerLyngemark
    Participant

    A couple of month ago I went to Hangzhou, where there are 9800 gasoline taxis and 200 EV Taxis. I was lucky enough to get EVs twice and once I went to the battery change depot (the local power company).

    The car could only go 80km on a charge, and it took 5min to change the four batteries (very manual labor, where they physically pulled out each of the 60kg batteries). The EV drivers wish was a car with 200km range (they drive around 300km per day). Both drivers I spoke to told me  that the local government would replace all the 9800 gasoline taxis once they found such a car.

    I think ZOE would be ideal (but might be a little too small in the back for passengers), with it’s range and potential to make quick charging while the drivers eat. Note that each car is driven 24hrs a day in two or three shifts, so there cannot be a long overnight charging.

    To be successful in China, you need a local partner, that’s why Nissan partner up with DongFeng. Hopefully Renault can enter China later, the taxi market would be the first, then the charging network would be built and the consumers would join very fast.

    #2014

    PerLyngemark
    Participant

    Asking around my friends in Sweden, seems that most people have 16A, 230V, 3phase in the garage, so I assume it will take 2hrs to charge the car under those circumstances.

    Since I might charge the car with and EVSE cable in friends places, if their wiring is not as good (older place), but still says 16A, could my charging cause fire or other issues? Fault would be bad wiring that cannot handle that high power. Would it be possible to set the ZOE to a slower charge? Would love to see that iPhone app… Hopefully some of the early users will post extensive reviews soon, since Renault are not providing any information…

    #2113

    Anonymous

    Hi,

    My name is Leszek,

    I work as fleet manager for car rental company in sussex and last year I have decided to go electric when i have swapped my diesel company car to electric only Peugeot iON.

    Since then I really have fallen in love with electric cars trying to encourage my sale teams in Brighton ,Lancing and Crawley to rent other 2 remaining iOns to the public.

    I am eagerly awaiting ZOE to launch in UK ,as I wish for it to be my next company car 🙂

    #2115

    Trevor Larkum
    Keymaster

    Welcome, Leszek!

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