Charging

Renault ZOE Charging

The page below was originally written in 2012 for the launch of the Renault ZOE – for the latest updated information click the button above.

2012-2014 Renault ZOE Charging

Zoe State of Charge Display (Image: Renault)
Zoe State of Charge Display (Image: Renault)

The Zoe has three methods of charging, considered here in terms of increasing cost and complexity but reducing charging time:

  1. Standard Charge (typically at home)
  2. Fast Charge (public charge station)
  3. Rapid Charge (high power public charge station)

There is no standard terminology applied to these different systems, so anything above a standard charge is often colloquially known as ‘fast charging’, whereas sometimes a distinction is made between ‘fast’ charging (anything above a typical domestic supply) and ‘quick’ or ‘rapid’ charging (very high power, at typically about 400V). The terminology used here is consistent with that used by Renault on English language websites.

Standard Charge

Renault Fluence Charging From a Wallbox (Image: I. Langsdon/EPA)
Renault Fluence Charging From a Wallbox (Image: I. Langsdon/EPA)

The most common method of charging by far is by plugging into a recharging point at home, typically in a garage. Usually this is done via a dedicated Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) wall box, but can be done occasionally using a charge cable plugged into a standard domestic socket.

Renault Kangoo Charging From a Standard Socket (Image: Reuters)
Renault Kangoo Charging From a Standard Socket (Image: Reuters)

In Europe a standard charge would use 3-4kW power from a standard single-phase 230V grid supply. As well as home chargers, this would also be applicable to some public charge stations. A charge would typically take 6-11 hours, though where higher power is available (say 7kW) this could be as low as 3 hours.

Fast Charge

Renault Zoe Fast Charging (Image: Renault)
Renault Zoe Fast Charging (Image: Renault)

Some public charge stations can supply higher power by making use of a three-phase supply. They can provide up to 22kW and so charging time is reduced to about an hour.

Rapid Charge

Renault Zoe Quick Charging (Image: Renault)
Renault Zoe Quick Charging (Image: Renault)

Some dedicated and specialised public charge stations can supply up to 43kW from a three-phase supply (e.g. Ecotricity charge points at motorway service stations and IKEA outlets). Charge time is reduced to about half an hour if the ZOE has the Rapid charge option, but because of the difficulty of completely filling a battery at high speed this is typically for an 80% charge.

Charging Times

To understand how charging times come about we need to consider some basic electrical theory, as follows:

  • Power (Watts) = Current (Amps) x Voltage (V)
  • Charge Time (hours) = Battery Capacity (kWh) / Power (kW)

In a three-phase system the power is simply three times the single-phase power. In Europe the Voltage is the standard supply voltage of 230V – this is true for our purposes whether it’s a domestic single-phase supply (as used in the home) or the phase voltage of a commercial three-phase supply (as used in a public fast charge station).

The nominal battery capacity of the Zoe is 22kWh. Using the various power options gives us a table as follows:

Charging TypePhasesCurrent (A)Voltage (V)Power (kW)Charge Time (hours)
Domestic socket1102302.39.5
Wall charger - standard1162303.76.0
Wall charger - high power1322307.43.0
Fast charger332230221.0
Rapid charger363400430.5

Some points to note:

  1. All values are approximate.
  2. All systems are assumed perfect, in fact power loss in the charging process means that charge times will be longer than these theoretical values, by perhaps 10%.
  3. The rapid charge time of half an hour is for about 80% capacity, as discussed above, because the charging process must slow down as the battery fills up.

Connectors and Cables

The charging point for the Zoe is at the front, in the nose under a flap that carries the main Renault logo. The flap can be opened via a switch on the dashboard or via a button on the remote control keycard. This reveals the port, with a ‘Z.E.’ (Zero Emissions) logo illuminated in blue above it. The port has a dust cap that then needs to be opened before a charging cable can be connected.

Zoe Charging Port Type 2 Socket (Image: Michelin/YouTube)
Zoe Charging Port Type 2 Socket (Image: Michelin/YouTube)

The connector is known as a Type 2; however, the design was originally created by Mennekes (a developer of the German standards for charging couplers) so the connector is often referred to colloquially as a ‘Mennekes’, or sometimes ‘Mennekes Type 2’.

Zoe Charging Port with Type 2 Plug Inserted (Image: Renault)
Zoe Charging Port with Type 2 Plug Inserted (Image: Renault)

The Type 2 is an advanced design, allowing for AC and DC charging, at high power, in the same connector. The connector itself is also typically more compact than competing standards.

Renault Z.E. Charging Cable – Fluence Example Shown (Image: Renault)
Renault Z.E. Charging Cable – Fluence Example Shown (Image: Renault)

A standard cable for connecting to a charge station comes with the vehicle. An additional cable for occasional charging through a standard domestic socket is available at extra cost.

Home Forums Zoe Information Charging

This topic contains 47 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  Trevor Larkum 1 year, 10 months ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 21 through 30 (of 58 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #29925

    Trevor Larkum
    Keymaster

    Mitsch, I’m not sure I understand your point – most BEVs require a wall chargebox. In the UK they are free or heavily subsidised, and there are such subsidies in other countries as well.

    #29926

    Jorge

    According to the table, Does the Zoe could charge in single phase at 32A in 7,4Kw? This would be very interesting in Spain,because we can make an easy upgrade of the electrical power up to 10kw with a phone call.
    On the car tests of the last week,the eng. team says that the recommended charge is 22kw…in Spain this power in non extended for a home use and needs an electrical revision by the electrical company and higher rates of fixed quotes and maintence…

    #29927

    MITSCH
    Participant

    My basement doen’t have GPRS signal, so I will not be able to install a wallbox ;(

    Can I ask, will I be able to charge with an occasional charging cable (I don’t mind buying it by myself)?
    It will probably be slower, but an overnight charge would work for me just fine.

    #29928

    david

    Hi I have to ask, why is a GPRS signal important. In the UK to gain government grants you have to pass back the transaction data including power consumed. If this is the senerio for yourself then why no just ask the charger suppplier to swap out the modem for a fix wire or Wifi LAN connection for the unit?

    If not save a bundle and do your own thing with a mode 3 charger without comms. You will save over £100.00

    #29929

    MITSCH
    Participant

    Yes, good idea with the fix wire, because there is signal just a couple of meters away. Thanks.

    I guess if I use only charging cable, then the mobile application doesn’t work (for charging control and cabin conditioning).

    #29930

    Andreas Gyllenhammar

    I’ve tried to search the web for any wall box offering charging from 3 phases 16A. (For my new Nissan Leaf with the 6.6kW charger) and couldn’t find any. Could you please provide any links to such?
    Regards
    Andreas

    #29931

    umberto
    Participant
    #29932

    Padraig

    We had the charge master fitted to the domestic supply by British gas (free) it’s 7kw at 32 amps and charges the Zoe up in 3 hours for a 100% charge. Padraig in Brighton.

    #29933

    Leszek

    Hi Padraig,
    Nice for You – You will be pleased to know that Ecotricity have rapid (43 kw) charger running in Pease Pottage off A23 and at Ikea Croydon so driving to London would be really nice now 😀

    It does make sense to have Zoe or Leaf now.

    Do You have a car already?

    #29934

    Chris H

    Hi Padraig,
    How did you get the 32A fitted for free? The BG & chargemaster websites both seem to say that an extra charge of around £100 to get the 32A one fitted?
    http://www.chargemasterplc.com/index.php/free_homecharge_offer/
    http://www.britishgas.co.uk/products-and-services/energy-saving/electric-vehicles/electric-charging-offers.html

    Thanks,

    Chris

Viewing 10 posts - 21 through 30 (of 58 total)

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