Charging

Zoe State of Charge Display (Image: Renault)
Zoe State of Charge Display (Image: Renault)

Charging Methods

The Zoe has three methods of charging, considered here in terms of increasing cost and complexity but reducing charging time:

  1. Standard Charge (typically at home)
  2. Fast Charge (public charge station)
  3. Rapid Charge (high power public charge station)

There is no standard terminology applied to these different systems, so anything above a standard charge is often colloquially known as ‘fast charging’, whereas sometimes a distinction is made between ‘fast’ charging (anything above a typical domestic supply) and ‘quick’ or ‘rapid’ charging (very high power, at typically about 400V). The terminology used here is consistent with that used by Renault on English language websites.

Standard Charge

Renault Fluence Charging From a Wallbox (Image: I. Langsdon/EPA)
Renault Fluence Charging From a Wallbox (Image: I. Langsdon/EPA)

The most common method of charging by far is by plugging into a recharging point at home, typically in a garage. Usually this is done via a dedicated Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) wall box, but can be done occasionally using a charge cable plugged into a standard domestic socket.

Renault Kangoo Charging From a Standard Socket (Image: Reuters)
Renault Kangoo Charging From a Standard Socket (Image: Reuters)

In Europe a standard charge would use 3-4kW power from a standard single-phase 230V grid supply. As well as home chargers, this would also be applicable to some public charge stations. A charge would typically take 6-11 hours, though where higher power is available (say 7kW) this could be as low as 3 hours.

Fast Charge

Renault Zoe Fast Charging (Image: Renault)
Renault Zoe Fast Charging (Image: Renault)

Some public charge stations can supply higher power by making use of a three-phase supply. They can provide up to 22kW and so charging time is reduced to about an hour.

Rapid Charge

Renault Zoe Quick Charging (Image: Renault)
Renault Zoe Quick Charging (Image: Renault)

Some dedicated and specialised public charge stations can supply up to 43kW from a three-phase supply (e.g. Ecotricity charge points at motorway service stations and IKEA outlets). Charge time is reduced to about half an hour if the ZOE has the Rapid charge option, but because of the difficulty of completely filling a battery at high speed this is typically for an 80% charge.

Charging Times

To understand how charging times come about we need to consider some basic electrical theory, as follows:

  • Power (Watts) = Current (Amps) x Voltage (V)
  • Charge Time (hours) = Battery Capacity (kWh) / Power (kW)

In a three-phase system the power is simply three times the single-phase power. In Europe the Voltage is the standard supply voltage of 230V – this is true for our purposes whether it’s a domestic single-phase supply (as used in the home) or the phase voltage of a commercial three-phase supply (as used in a public fast charge station).

The nominal battery capacity of the Zoe is 22kWh. Using the various power options gives us a table as follows:

Charging TypePhasesCurrent (A)Voltage (V)Power (kW)Charge Time (hours)
Domestic socket1102302.39.5
Wall charger - standard1162303.76.0
Wall charger - high power1322307.43.0
Fast charger332230221.0
Rapid charger363400430.5

Some points to note:

  1. All values are approximate.
  2. All systems are assumed perfect, in fact power loss in the charging process means that charge times will be longer than these theoretical values, by perhaps 10%.
  3. The rapid charge time of half an hour is for about 80% capacity, as discussed above, because the charging process must slow down as the battery fills up.

Connectors and Cables

The charging point for the Zoe is at the front, in the nose under a flap that carries the main Renault logo. The flap can be opened via a switch on the dashboard or via a button on the remote control keycard. This reveals the port, with a ‘Z.E.’ (Zero Emissions) logo illuminated in blue above it. The port has a dust cap that then needs to be opened before a charging cable can be connected.

Zoe Charging Port Type 2 Socket (Image: Michelin/YouTube)
Zoe Charging Port Type 2 Socket (Image: Michelin/YouTube)

The connector is known as a Type 2; however, the design was originally created by Mennekes (a developer of the German standards for charging couplers) so the connector is often referred to colloquially as a ‘Mennekes’, or sometimes ‘Mennekes Type 2’.

Zoe Charging Port with Type 2 Plug Inserted (Image: Renault)
Zoe Charging Port with Type 2 Plug Inserted (Image: Renault)

The Type 2 is an advanced design, allowing for AC and DC charging, at high power, in the same connector. The connector itself is also typically more compact than competing standards.

Renault Z.E. Charging Cable – Fluence Example Shown (Image: Renault)
Renault Z.E. Charging Cable – Fluence Example Shown (Image: Renault)

A standard cable for connecting to a charge station comes with the vehicle. An additional cable for occasional charging through a standard domestic socket is available at extra cost.

Home Forums Zoe Information Charging

This topic contains 57 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  Trevor Larkum 5 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 51 through 58 (of 58 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #29955

    Domes32
    Participant

    Hi,
    it is good. I have Renault Zoe and I buy charging cable from ww.r-evc.com.
    I’m satisfied now, because I charging from “schuko” socket. And I can selected the Ampers from 6A to 16A, now I charged my Zoe everywhere 🙂

    #29956

    Trevor Larkum
    Keymaster

    Nigel – sorry for the delay in seeing your question. It is Type 2 Mennekes both ends. Your best bet for questions is to ask them in the Owners Forums (see link at top of page).

    #29957

    IEmobility Sonnenuhrendorf

    Die intelligente Ladeelektronik für 100% Elektrofahrzeuge z.B. “Konduktive Ladung von elektrischen Straßenfahrzeugen nach IEC62196 und IEC61851” ist unter 200 EUR (ex work) verfügbar und integrierbar.
    If you need the intelligent electrical part with further features (very small) for “conductive charging of BEV ICE62196 and IEC61851” please do not hesitate to contact on Facebook via PN IEmobility Sonnenuhrendorf. Charge i.E ZOE with 3.7 – 22 kW. Other solutions and integration services on request.

    #29958

    MagSense -R

    http://www.mobilisis.eu/en/applications/car-detection/park-ride-autarke-zaehlung-durch-solarenergie/ Adapt integration of chargingsolutions. Option with telematics in Realtime – crashsensor etc. (c)

    #29959

    Sira Cheung

    Hi,
    WE are EV portable charger supplier . The charger has both type 1 and type 2, current could be adjusted from 8A to 32A. . Anybody needs could contact :
    Sira: sales05(at)cnkhons.com
    whatsapp:+8613215734637

    #29960

    George

    Are you sure you didn’t forget to change the voltage for that 63 Ah table? In order to charge the 22 kwh battery in half an hour you would need 400v? For 230V @63Ah (if there is such a supply you would need 1.5 hours? 230V@63Ah=14.5KwH on single phase and 1 hour on a three phase line 230V@63Ah=25.1 Kw/H

    #29961

    Robert campbell

    Can anyone here tell me if the Zoe charger can be used on a Nissan Leaf home charge unit fitted on my outside wall

    #30035

    Trevor Larkum
    Keymaster

    Are you sure you didn’t forget to change the voltage for that 63 Ah table? In order to charge the 22 kwh battery in half an hour you would need 400v

    George – well spotted, fixed!

    Can anyone here tell me if the Zoe charger can be used on a Nissan Leaf home charge unit fitted on my outside wall

    Robert, if you’re asking if the ZOE and Leaf use the same connector and the car end then no, the ZOE uses Type 2 and Leaf uses Type 1. Of course, if the unit is not tethered then you could use the car’s own cable as they are both Type 2 at the charge point end.

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